Page 6 - Referees

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10 POINT PLAn
TO BE A TOP ASSISTANT
ByMikeMullarkey
Mike Mullarkey, assistant referee at EURO 2008, the 2010 UEFA Champions’ League
Final and the FIFA 2010 World Cup Final, suggests 10 ways in which an assistant
referee at any level can achieve a high quality performance:
I don’t mean your on-field decisions, that is a given. But how honestly do you assess
your own performance and how honestly do you discuss your game with your assessor,
referee and mentor? Do you ask yourself ‘What do I need to do to be better?’. Do you
own up to mistakes you have made, or try to cover them up?
1.
Honesty
Are you willing to make the necessary sacrifices to achieve your dreams and goals?
Will you give up Friday night with your friends to prepare properly? Will you dedicate
yourself to have a good diet and to train regularly, not just when the weather is
favourable or your fitness test is due?
2.
Dedication
Gone are the days when 30 minutes steady jogging is suitable training. Ensure you tailor
your training to the demands of the job. You need to include speed work, sideways
movement etc into your training to replicate match situations.
3.
Fitness
Your role as an assistant is like that of a goalkeeper. You may have spells when you are
not directly involved in the game but, when needed, you may well be making a decision
where a goal is the outcome. Being fully focused and ready is, therefore, vital. Develop
techniques to keep focus. This may be breaking the game up into 10 minute blocks,
constantly talking to yourself, reminding yourself which players are on yellow cards etc.
4.
Concentration
Remember, as an assistant, you are there to support and aid the referee, not to try and
run the show. Be clear about your duties within the Laws of the Game and be certain you
fully understand what the referee is asking of you in each particular match. Ensure you
understand what areas of the field of play the referee is expecting your involvement.
Your role is to support the referee in getting as many decisions correct as possible.
5.
Teamwork
The way in which you move along the touchline and the way you deliver your signals go a
long way to selling the decisions you make and the confidence that the referee, players,
officials and spectators will have in your ability. Practice your technique in front of the
mirror and don’t dismiss feedback on technique as petty or of little value.
6.
Technique
Mike Mullarkey
FIFA and Select Group Assistant Referee
Assistant Referee 2010 UEFA Champions’ League Final and 2010 FIFAWorld Cup Final